Mile 1607.7 Bennington, VT – Lost Treasure, The Clash, and Info

I really like information. Being in the wilderness and out of the know on the Appalachian Trail is difficult for me. I certainly don’t want to know about world events or the news. But I love the Information Age for the ability to read about any topic on Wikipedia. I also love books but I can’t afford the weight to carry them or the time to read them on the trail. I’d like to know the status and whereabouts of dozens of hikers I’ve met on the trail, but likely I’ll never know who makes it to Katahdin and when. I suppose the motto “hike your own hike” is what matters. People come and go. I just need to walk North.

We got a shuttle ride into to town today from a local guy named Steve. He and I got to talking about Vermont in the Revolutionary War. I brought the topic up of whether the Long Trail was used for moving the famous cannon from Ft. Ticonderoga to The siege of Boston. It just turned out that Steve knows all about local history. The route of the cannon it turns out is not the Long Trail which was created much later. Even more interestingly, Steve spoke of a lost treasure of sorts. One of the cannon, it is rumored, was left on Hawks Mt. When the cart carrying it broke down. Rather than doing a lot of work to keep it moving the cannon was simply left there. Sightings have been rumored to have been made by hunters and hikers but its location has never been found.

We hiked 18 miles today crossing into Vermont from Massachusetts after 4.1 miles. The mosquitoes were moderate and the temperatures only in the mid 80’s. There is a second heat wave coming this week bringing temperatures into the 90’s again. I really pray for the patience and toughness to handle hiking in this weather.

Although the weather has been terrible for most of my AT hike, it seems I’ve actually dodged worse conditions elsewhere. In Pennsylvania there are now floods. In Vermont there were floods a few weeks ago. This could go down as the wettest year on the AT, but I suppose measuring such a statistic is impossible.

The clash is upon us. The clash is the term given for the time when northbound and southbound thru-hikers start crossing paths. I am now seeing the front of the southbound pack.

I had great conversation with Don’s Brother and Pilgrim today. Much of it theological. I’ve ready and excited to start seminary in the fall. I’m craving new information and material to study. The hike has cleared my mind and readied it for the future. I believe I’ll be able to think more clearly and patiently than if I had not made this hike.

I’m zeroing tomorrow and hope to get a chance to write more but and falling asleep at the moment and must go.

-BANZAI!!!

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About douglasdouma

I am a graduate of the University of Michigan (BSME), Wake Forest University (MBA), and Sangre de Cristo Seminary (Mdiv). I've learned far more from books than in school. I'm particularly in debt to Martin Luther, Ludwig von Mises, and Gordon H. Clark for any thoughts I have.
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2 Responses to Mile 1607.7 Bennington, VT – Lost Treasure, The Clash, and Info

  1. Lydia says:

    You don’t have time to read books? For real? Let’s process this. You’re out in the middle of nature. You have no job or home to return to. You’re just walking at whatever pace you decide to set for yourself. And eventually you’ll be finished and then you’ll move on with life. Right? What’s the rush? Dude. Find a stump. Sit down. Commune with nature by reading paper made from cousins of the trees you’re walking beneath. Seems only fitting. 🙂
    But hey… if you really mean it, then I won’t mail you more literature. Sheesh.

    • douglasdouma says:

      It takes about 10 hours a day of hiking. The rest is packing, unpacking, and eating. The bugs would eat you alive. You can ask Jason, he’ll say the same thing. There is unfortunately little or no relaxing on the trail. It’s still fun but usually only upon reflection.

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